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Submitted By Tyler TennantMonday, October 19, 2015 - 1:18pm

    Though the weather left something slightly warmer to be desired, the South Side History Bike Tour united three faculty members—Undergraduate College Dean John Boyer, and Professors Mark Hanson and Terry Clarkand over fifty students, throughout a little over six hours, explore ten historical sites of the South Side via their bikes.

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Submitted By Study ChicagoSunday, May 24, 2015 - 7:59pm

People and space are inextricably interwoven—buildings, streets, and cities often define the formation of neighborhoods and communities. Sometimes experiments and new projects are undertaken; boundaries are redefined, communities pried apart, and buildings built or torn down. In the case of Chicago’s housing projects, the “project” was not contained to a classroom or laboratory but rather exerted tangible and long-lasting influences on the course of Chicago history and especially on the city’s residents.

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Submitted By Study ChicagoSunday, May 24, 2015 - 7:53pm

Community Development in Chicago Lawn and Englewood

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Submitted By Lily GordonWednesday, May 6, 2015 - 9:12pm

Fourteen days. Six restaurants. One pescetarian.

Editor's note:  As we reach the end of the academic year, and students and families alike are looking for great Chicago restaurants to celebrate in, we wanted to feature this collection of restaurant reviews from fourth-year Civic Journalist Lily Gordon, originally submitted in February of this year.  Bon appetit!

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Submitted By Study ChicagoFriday, May 1, 2015 - 12:00am

Despite the fact that I have lived in Chicago for almost three years now, I had never been to Navy Pier – so walking through this tourist ridden corporate extravaganza (“I feel like I am in Disney World!”) to get to the WBEZ studies was an experience within itself. But that’s what “studying abroad” in Chicago is all about, right?

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Submitted By Study ChicagoFriday, April 24, 2015 - 12:00am

I absolutely love Pullman, because it's a place with an interesting history that shows how spaces can be designed to induce certain behaviors. For example, Green Stone Church was centrally located, so all residents had easy access, and there were no pubs or taverns so people could not drink, all of which promoted a sense of morality. Additionally, it shows that a space can be socially segregated, even when residents live within blocks of one another. Young, unmarried, unskilled laborers lived in dorms segregated by sex, while skilled laborers with families lived in single-family homes.

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Submitted By Kristin WalkoTuesday, November 18, 2014 - 2:30pm

As I peered down the sidewalk, the line from the entrance of the National Museum of Mexican Art tracked down the block. For the first time, I was participating in the museum’s annual Dia de los Muertos, Day of the Dead Celebrations. The event promised special exhibits, festive crafts, sugar skulls and face painting. This event has become a tradition in Pilsen, my professor Morris Fred told me about it saying, “Oh we never miss it. It’s fantastic,” but this year, it seemed to bring in a particularly large crowd.

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Submitted By Kristin WalkoWednesday, November 5, 2014 - 4:20pm

Earlier this month, I walked through the cold and drizzle from the Halstead bus stop to Bridgeport’s block 33 lot where the Pop 33 Art Fair had set up shop. As I filtered through the lot shopkeepers smiled as they stood under their prospective tents selling their local wares.

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Submitted By Sarah MillerSunday, November 2, 2014 - 2:45pm

From Saturday, October 18th to Sunday, October 19th

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Submitted By Lily GordonTuesday, October 28, 2014 - 10:21pm

When I woke up on Saturday morning and headed to the 61st Street Farmers’ Market, I stepped out into a cold, damp day—a day that reminded me that winter was on its way.

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